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Juicing – The New Liquid Lunch?

This morning I stumbled across an article on the New York Times website about juicing. You can see the article here:

It’s sad to me what some in the fashion industry have done to juicing. Maybe it’s the fact that the article is in the Fashion & Style section? Maybe it’s the fact that the article is written by Eric Wilson, a predominately fashion writer?

cold-pressed-juiceOr it’s more likely the fact that I approach juicing and better health from a completely different perspective.

Here’s a quote from the article:

“It has become normal practice for everyone to start juicing three days before show time,” said Roopal Patel, a fashion consultant.

So in other words “everyone” is going on a crash diet, three days before showtime to shed water weight and to lose a few pounds.

Here’s another quote:

“But let’s not harsh on juice. Supposedly, it can be good for you. There are vitamins and such. When life gives you lemons … you add some cayenne pepper.”

I realize that adding cayenne pepper to lemons is a tongue in cheek joke about the Master Cleanse aka Lemonade Diet, perpetuated by Beyonce losing weight quickly before making the movie Dreamgirls.

But it just perpetuates everything that’s wrong with Hollywood, as well as the fashion industries take on dieting. And how we as a nation of crash dieters, looking for quick fixes, will follow what we see on television and on the runway.

A good diet shouldn’t be a flash in the pan for three days, and it sure as heck shouldn’t be a liquid, low nutrient, two week long fasting plan.

Sure, have a juice for lunch. But if you get hungry 90 minutes later, and you probably will, have some chicken and green beans.

Please, have a freshly pressed vegetable juice in place of your morning coffee. But don’t replace breakfast with it. A health diet needs to be sustainable for years, not days or weeks.

Juicing is simply a way to get more nutrients in with your regular food. You’ll feel more energetic, have a healthier complexion, and lose weight by limiting empty calories by replacing them with fresh juice.

Again, from the article:

“Still, juicing can be a ridiculously expensive habit, especially when you add on the solid-food options at some of the popular stores.”

Darn right. You can get end up paying a ridiculous markup at stores like Juice Press for the exact same drink that you can make at home. Or you can buy fresh fruits and vegetables from your local grocer (no you don’t have to go organic) for a fraction of you’ll pay at a trendy market.

Juicing is not fabulous!

And juicing should not be trendy, although that’s definitely the direction it has gone.

Juicing is healthy. So use some common sense and don’t go Hollywood or runway on me.

Stick to what you learn here at The Juicer Directory and in real quality articles about improving your body like this article from the Wall Street Journal. You’re body with thank you and I’ll be proud of you.

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